SEARCH WEBSITE
   SEARCH ARCHIVES - click here

Advocate History

No Images Available

In the issue of this paper [Missouri Gazette] of December 24, 1824, a prospectus was printed which announced that the Gazette had been transferred to Keemle and Foreman, and would be published as the Missouri Advocate.
On February 15, 1825, the Advocate informed its readers that the paper “will in future, be issued in the city of St. Louis. Our subscribers in St. Charles will find their papers at the Post Office; and those of the City will be waited on at their respective places of residence.” The first number of the Advocate appeared in St. Louis on February 28, 1825, bearing the motto—“Missouri and Missouri’s Friends.”...The Advocate greeted the citizens of St. Louis with the following message:
“On our first number, impressed with the importance of the object, we intimated to the public our determination to establish a paper which should be ‘characterized for advocating the rights, and fearlessly speaking the will of the people, on all subjects of National and state policy.’ That we might furnish the public with more frequent and general evidences of this ruling principle we looked to St. Louis, (and we hope, without the least derogation to other situations in the State) as a point, concentrating more political information, and other intelligence of a local and general nature, than any other. Availing ourselves of those advantages, we expect, by an indefatigable devotion to the duties of our office, in the progress of time, to furnish the public with a useful and interesting paper.”
Keemle’s next move was the purchase of the Enquirer from Duff Green; combined with his Advocate, the paper became known as the Missouri Advocate and St. Louis Enquirer.
(From the dissertation Early St. Louis Newspapers, 1808-1850 by Dorothy Grace Brown, Washington University, 1931).

Var: Missouri Advocate.