SEARCH WEBSITE
               
SEARCH ARCHIVES - click here

The St. Louis Enquirer History

In 1818 the Emigrant was purchased by Isaac N. Henry, Evarist Maury, and Col. Thomas H. Benton, the firm being Isaac N. Henry & Co., and the name was changed to the St. Louis Enquirer. For some years Col. Benton was the chief editor. In 1820, William Henry died and Mr. Maury withdrew, whereupon Patrick H. Ford took possession of the office for Col. Benton, the surviving proprietor. Mr. Ford retired in October, 1824, and died in January, 1826. He was succeeded by Gen Duff Green...who purchased the establishment. In 1825, Gen. Green retired, and the paper was transferred to Charles Keemle and S.W. Foreman, the latter of whom had removed a small printing office from St. Charles to St. Louis. In February, 1826, Mr. Keemle withdrew, and Mr. Foreman then associated James A. Birch with himself in the management of the Enquirer. During the same year the material of the Enquirer was sold under a deed of trust from Duff Green to Col. Benton, and was purchased by L.E. Lawless. Mr. Lawless then became the editor, and Charles Keemle the printer of the paper. In 1827, the establishment again became the property of Charles Keemle, who, with Charles Orr, transformed the paper into the Beacon, which expired in 1832.
(From the History of St. Louis City and County by John Thomas Scharf, 1883).