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St. Louis Morning Herald History

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Russell S. Higgins returned to St. Louis in 1852 and associated himself with Phillip G. Ferguson on the Morning Herald. It became a paying paper. He sold out his interest in the Herald about 1854 and moved away…Mr. Higgins was almost alone of the newspaper proprietors of those days who could show a good balance at the end of the year.
(From St. Louis, the Fourth City by William Barlow Stevens, 1909).

Higgins was a man of some literary ability, and a writer of pungent editorials; Ferguson was a wooer of the muse of poesy, and did the local reporting. During the first year of the Herald's existence the editorials on banking, real estate and financial questions were written by Nicolas N. De Menil. In 1853 James L. Faucette bought Higgins' interest in the paper. He was a printer on the Herald and aspired to be a local politician. For some years after Higgins' retirement the principal editorial writer was W.S. Allen, who also furnished financial reports three times a week for the Republican...During the Civil War the Herald, being avowedly Southern in its tone, was suppressed by the national government.
(From the Encyclopedia of the History of Missouri edited by Howard Conard, 1901).

Var.:Daily Morning Herald, St. Louis Daily Morning Herald